Month: January 2021

January 28, 2021

Coronavirus Dispatch: Horror scenes in Lebanon intensive care wards

Lebanon’s intensive care wards are gripped with dreaded scenes, leaving the doctors and staff with no choice but to make life and death decisions about who should receive scarce medical resources and choose between two people on who to save and who to leave dying. 

Virus-stricken people are gasping for breath, in the horror hospital scenes as rising cases, following Christmas holidays, swamped the scanty medical resources. The medics say they are on the edge of “the Italy scenario”. More than 1,000 people have died of COVID-19 in Lebanon in January. 

“The country is falling apart,”

While many countries have grappled with hospital bed shortages and the need to prioritise care, Lebanon’s response has been hobbled by the more than year-long financial crisis and the blast at Beirut port, which devastated the city, partly destroying four hospitals.

Two weeks into a strict lockdown, inconsistently enforced, Lebanon’s intensive care units are 94 percent full. The entire country is affected.

Some hospitals had to treat patients in the hallways and in the emergency department entrance. Patients admitted to hectic emergency wards alone face the prospect of dying far from family. Medical staff just hold iPads up to the dying so they can see their families one last time. 

January 6, 2021

The increasing number of suicide cases in Iraq worries public health experts amidst COVID-19 pandemic

The growing number of suicide cases in Iraq over the past years is a worrying public health concern that can no longer be ignored. If not addressed, it will keep taking a heavy toll on individuals and communities in the country.

Over 590 people died in 2019 due to suicide, and 1112 attempted it in Iraq; 80% of them were women which translates to an average of one death per day due to suicide, and three people per day to have attempted suicide. The number of suicide cases reported in 2019 is higher than those reported in 2018 (519) and 2017 (422). It’s important to note that although suicide is tragic, it is often preventable. Knowing the causes for suicide and who is at risk can help reduce the mortality.

Over several years, many Iraqi families have suffered with mental health scars caused by past conflicts and economic hostilities, as if this is not enough; many communities have also faced new stay-at-home restrictions or limited movements to curb the spread of COVID-19. This, public health experts say, raises concerns as it may increase suicide rates or associated risk factors, including social isolation, anxiety, fear of contagion, uncertainty, unemployment, chronic stress, and economic difficulties, which could worsen depression, anxiety, and substance. Other factors include barriers to access mental health services, depression, and insomnia among populations and some healthcare professionals.

Also, various factors could contribute to rates of suicide in Iraq, including intimate partner problems, physical health conditions, financial challenges, and legal issues. Others are personal or family experiences of violence, for instance, child abuse, neglect, or family history of suicide and broader community conditions, such as high crime rates and violence.

SEMA US acknowledges suicide as a public health priority. Globally, 800,000 people die yearly due to suicide, and for every case, more than 20 others most likely attempt suicide. There is also one death recorded every 40 seconds globally due to suicide.

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