Month: November 2020

November 28, 2020

Give the Gift of Healthcare This Giving Tuesday

This year has been one of the hardest years we’ve ever experienced. The truth is, life is kind of on hold due to the pandemic; but the other diseases still travel their path. Our current refugee patients have experienced the hardship on a level that many of us have not.

This #GivingTuesday, we encourage you to donate and help us give these refugee families in Lebanon an easier way of life in these tough times. 

The holidays this year may look different for many of us, but one thing remains the same: December 1 is a day to give.  And we’re so thankful you’re a part of this community that spreads hope around the world, even under these extraordinary circumstances.

As a supporter who is also committed to ensuring that underserved communities have access to health services, we hope you’ll take some time to learn about us and the people we serve.

Medical and support staff from SEMA US continue to provide essential health services where they’re needed most, despite challenges created by the COVID-19 pandemic. In Lebanon, our teams overcome enormous obstacles to continue working safely. They face logistical challenges, local and global lockdown measures, and equipment shortages, all to continue SEMA US’ critical health care mission.

Countries need to use every tool available to make sure that COVID-19 medical products are accessible and affordable for everyone who needs them and this move would pave the way for more affordable generic versions of desperately needed drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics.

Your thoughtful participation  would go a long way. Mark your calendars for Giving Tuesday on December 1st!

November 19, 2020

Syrian refugee in Lebanon sets himself on fire

A Syrian refugee in Beirut was hospitalized after setting himself on fire outside the United Nations refugee agency’s reception center in the Lebanese capital.

In the tragic incident, he was rescued and immediately taken to hospital where he is receiving necessary medical care. The UNHCR’s office in Lebanon is following up closely on his condition and supporting his family in this difficult time.

The 58-year-old man was rescued by UNHCR security personnel and then transferred to a hospital by the Lebanese civil defense. A spokesperson for Lebanon’s Internal Security Forces told the news agency the man set himself on fire because he couldn’t afford to pay for his sick daughter’s medical treatment.

Lebanon hosts the world’s largest per capita population of Syrian refugees at 1.5 million. Because the Lebanese government does not provide formal camps for the refugees, most have ended up in poorly constructed residential buildings, rural settlements or improvised tents.

The country’s residency rules make it difficult for Syrian refugees to legally find work. Those who do tend to find jobs in low-skilled sectors where they are at risk of abuse and exploitation.

Their already poor conditions have been compounded by Lebanon’s ongoing financial crisis and the massive explosion that tore through Beirut in August. The coming winter weather has aid agencies warning the coronavirus could quickly spread among refugee populations where access to sanitation and health care is limited.

But for many refugees, the bigger threat is deportation. According to Human Rights Watch, the Lebanese government deported over 2,500 refugees to Syria in 2019 despite the continued conflict in their home country.

Over 5.6 million people have fled Syria since the start of the conflict in 2011. The UN estimates a further 6.6 million people are displaced within Syria.

November 12, 2020

Lebanon heading for total lockdown as health sector buckles

(Photo: AFP)

The Lebanese authorities will impose a two-week nationwide lockdown at the end of this week in the hope of suppressing the spread of Covid-19.

The lockdown will start at 05:00 local time on 14 November and last until 05:00 on 30 November. President Michel Aoun said the lockdown may be extended if the containment measures do not yield satisfactory results.

As of November 9, the total number of people infected with the virus was more than 95,000, with daily rates sometimes exceeding 2,000, while the number of deaths has reached 725. The number of COVID-19 cases during the first week of November alone hit 13,000, while the total number of cases in October exceeded 42,000 cases, the highest number recorded since the virus was first detected in Lebanon in February. 

Lebanon’s continued abandonment of taking strict measures to contain the spread of coronavirus will mean that no one will remain to treat those infected with the virus in hospitals. 17 doctors were in intensive care units, three doctors had died, and that 100 doctors were under home quarantine. The number of people infected in the medical and nursing body had reached 1,500. 

A Lebanon hospital specializing in receiving coronavirus cases has one infection in every 125 that leads to death and that figure rose to one in 10 among the elderly. 

(Photo: AFP)

Lebanon will enter a new phase of complete lockdown. Without it, the economic situation will worsen in light of the spread of the virus. But the idea of a complete lockdown for two weeks, or even a month, has provoked a negative reaction among the Lebanese public. The consensus is that a lockdown is useless without a clear strategy for the next steps.

The thing is we have yet to know the procedures that will accompany the closure, and the goal is to give the medical and nursing staff a chance to catch a breath.

November 4, 2020

Beirut Is a Shambles, and Syrian Refugees Are Willing to Help

International donors are wary—but the country’s most reviled residents are making the difference.

Syrian workers are rebuilding blast-hit areas in Beirut, one window at a time. Often reviled for allegedly burdening the civic infrastructure, stealing jobs, and living off subsidies meant for the Lebanese, Syrian refugees have shown up in Lebanon’s hour of need. They are building windows, repairing doors, painting houses, and replacing glass in high-rise apartment buildings—some of which belong to the same Lebanese who have long rooted for the refugees to leave.

For all their manual labor, they have received only a pittance—payment further devalued by a plummeting Lebanese pound that has lost 80 percent of its value since a year ago. But more bothersome for many is the continued lack of respect. Hardly any of the refugees toiling to resurrect Beirut to its former glory believe their contribution will be remembered.

Almost three months after thousands of tons of unsafely stored ammonium nitrate exploded at Beirut’s port and damaged many districts popular with locals and tourists, much of the city still lies in ruins. The international community has so far only provided minimal emergency aid

The efforts, numerous and well meant, fall far short of what is required to rebuild and revive the city. None has received any help from the government, and most have yet to receive support from international agencies.

As the political elite quarrels over ministries and the international community scrambles to help, Syrian workers are visible on the streets. Syrians, too, died in the catastrophe and left behind desperate families. At least 40 were killed in the blast, hundreds were injured, and eight are still hospitalized. The living conditions of Syrians in Lebanon deteriorated in tandem with their hosts, but since they were already the bottom rung of society, it pinched them harder.

These Syrian refugees are the very same people who have proved to be more reliable for home- and business owners who have, on their own, started to slowly repair their damaged properties.

Scroll to top